Course Descriptions:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE CORE REQUIREMENTS
CJUS 110 | Survey of Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)
This course introduces students to general criminal justice concepts and knowledge about the relationships of crime and criminal behavior. The purpose, role, and interrelationships of the police, other law enforcement officials, the courts and judiciary, corrections, and parole systems are discussed.
Components: Lecture

CJUS 220 | Introduction to Corrections (3 credit hours)
This course is a general introductory course that describes the history and development of corrections in America, the various aspects of correctional practices, and issues and perspectives affecting institutional life within the correctional system. Organizational and administrative practices are examined.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 230 | Policing (3 credit hours)
This course covers the major roles of the police in American society. The course investigates the origins of policing and law enforcement, police organization, the functions of police in society, and the polices’ relationships to the various components of the criminal justice system. Issues confronting police administration are discussed.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 308 | Community-Based Corrections (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on correctional processes and strategies regarding probation, parole, juveniles, diversion, and other innovative approaches applied in a community setting.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 330 | Research Methods (3 credit hours)
This is an introductory course that concentrates on research methods and designs and statistical analysis procedures used in research projects. This course demonstrates how research methods are utilized in the criminal justice field.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110 and STAT 210 (or MATH 240 or 340)

CJUS 340 | Criminal Procedures and the Courts (3 credit hours)
This course provides an overview of the structure and functions of the criminal court system in the United States, including county, state, federal, and specialized courts. The roles of court personnel, case flow management, a variety of issues confronting the court system, court standards as compared to actual functioning, and court reform measures are studied. Constitutional rules regarding evidence, search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, and suspect identification guidelines receive significant attention. Constitutional rights, remedies, post-trial appeal processes, and criminal procedure during times of crisis receive consideration.
Components: Lecture

CJUS 360 | Criminology (3 credit hours)
This course examines the nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 385 | Victimology (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on the theoretical perspectives of victimization, the scope of victimization in the United States, the justice system’s response, victim’s rights, restorative justice, and research and evaluation findings. Being exposed to and understanding victimization issues enhances students’ knowledge about a comprehensive system of justice rather than a “criminal’s justice system.”
Components: Lecture

CJUS 401 | Homeland Security (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of Homeland Security, incident management, terrorism and counter terrorism as impacting the United States.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 410 | Juvenile Delinquency (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on the nature and extent of delinquent acts and status offenses historically, theoretical approaches to explain why these behaviors develop including environmental/contextual approaches to explanation, and how the justice system and society legally respond. A variety of cultural and social factors related to delinquency are examined, along with program implications for prevention and intervention.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CJUS 110

CJUS 495 | Seminar In Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)
This course requires students to use critical thinking, research, oral and written communication skills to investigate, discuss and explain how major criminal justice theories contribute to an understanding of deviant, delinquent or abnormal behaviors and crime. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion and evaluation of contemporary problems facing one of the elements of the criminal justice system; law enforcement, courts, and corrections. This senior level seminar is the capstone experience and senior competency course for criminal justice students and should be taken in the last year of study.
Components: Lecture
Requirement Group: For Seniors Only

REQUIRED PROGRAM PREREQUISITES
CMIS 101 | Information Systems Concepts and Applications (3 credit hours)
This course is an introduction to basic computer concepts and Windows-based spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software currently used in industry. Development of problem-solving and proficiency using selected commercial software packages is stressed.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Technology & Its Application

PSYC 121 | Introduction to Psychology (3 credit hours)
This course is a general introduction to contemporary psychology focusing on basic concepts, principles, terminology, trends in psychological research, and the application of this knowledge.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science

SOC 201 | Principles of Sociology (3 credit hours)
This course is an introductory study of group and social dynamics, cultures, social problems, social institutions, inter-group relationships, and the impact of social policies.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science

JUSTICE COUNSELING OPTION REQUIREMENTS
Select eight (8) courses from the following options

CJUS 190 | Criminal Law (3 credit hours)
This course will focus on the concepts of substantive criminal law as they pertain to elements of criminal acts. Special focus will be assigned to basic legal concepts such as assigning punishment, voluntary criminal acts and omissions, explaining the nexus between mens rea and actus reus. Topics will also include theories of causation, homicide, theft, affirmative defences and attempted crimes. Further, contemporary criminal law issues confronting law enforcement officials from crime prevention to court appearance are considered. Special attention will also be given to evidentiary standards relating to rules of relevancy, character evidence and hearsay.
Components: Lecture

CJUS 441 | Criminal Justice Internship (3 credit hours)
This course is designed for students to explore and gain work experience related to their major and anticipated career goals. Students may enroll for 1-12 hours of graded credit. A minimum of forty hours of work experience will be required for each hour of credit per semester. The student will complete necessary paperwork with the employer and the Internship Supervisor. Contact the Center for Engaged Learning for specific details.
Components:
Coop Ed Internship
Prerequisites required:
45 completed hours and good academic standing

CJUS 442 | Criminal Justice Internship (3 credit hours)
This course is designed for students to explore and gain work experience related to their major and anticipated career goals. Students may enroll for 1-12 hours of graded credit. A minimum of forty hours of work experience will be required for each hour of credit per semester. The student will complete necessary paperwork with the employer and the Internship Supervisor. Contact the Center for Engaged Learning for specific details.
Components:
Coop Ed Internship
Prerequisites required:
CJUS 441 and 45 completed hours and good academic standing

CJUS 450 | Criminalistics (3 credit hours)
This course introduces students to the basics of forensic science, focusing on the legal and procedural methods of evidence and evidence collection techniques to include fingerprint collection and analysis, firearms identification, gunshot residue, tool marks, footprint and tire mark impressions, forensic serology, blood splatter evidence, forensic photography, DNA theory and analysis, and electronic surveillance issues.
Components: Lecture

CJUS 490 | Comparative Justice and Human Services Systems (3 credit hours)
This course allows students the opportunity to examine and compare the United States criminal justice system with those existing in foreign countries. Exploration and problem identification of key contemporary issues affecting these systems is an integral course element. The criminal justice system(s) under study are contrasted with the courts, policing, corrections and juvenile justice systems within the American system. In addition, innovative human service delivery systems are studied from a critical policy response perspective. Cultural and social factors that have influenced the development and ongoing operation of each system under study receive in depth examination. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Community, Regional & Global Studies
Requirement Group: Sophomore Standing

CJUS 491 | International Field Experience (3 credit hours)
This is a specialized international field experience where students are immersed in the criminal justice and human service systems to examine and compare the various aspects of each country’s systems. Cultural and social factors that have influenced the development of each system under study will be examined. Students will attend daily scheduled presentations, tours, social and cultural events and celebrations, visit historical sites, volunteer to help local agencies, and participate in other educational opportunities that become available for students while in-country.
Components: Lecture

CJUS 498 | Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)
Study of a topic in a special area of interest. No more than eight (8) hours of Special Topics may be counted toward graduation requirements.
Components:
Special Topics
Prerequisites required:
For Juniors and Seniors Only

CMIS 300 | Information Systems Management (3 credit hours)
This course introduces concepts of systems management from a business viewpoint and an information systems viewpoint. Students utilize graphical tools including flowcharts to examine business and information systems processes. Fundamental programming concepts are introduced including algorithms, data types, control structures and Boolean logic. An overview of project management including critical path and dependencies is introduced.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Technology & Its Application

CMIS 360 | Cyber Security (3 credit hours)
Fundamentals of information security are addressed. Current issues as well as historical incidents will be examined to assess vulnerabilities and provide solutions and countermeasures. Topics include identification and authentication, access control, security models, and operating system integrity. Security is considered from macro and micro scales and from virtual to physical intrusions. Costs, potential liabilities, and other issues with data leakage are explored. This course is designed so students of any major with an interest in Cyber Security may take the course.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Technology & Its Application
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: CMIS 101

COUN 300 | Professional Ethics (3 credit hours)
This course introduces students to the profession of chemical dependency/addictions counseling with an emphasis on professional ethics and issues in alcohol and drug counseling. Students study the NAADAC ethical guidelines as well as histories and philosophies of ethical code development in related fields such as medicine, psychology, and social work. Students will also investigate how many ethical issues are practically resolved through interviews with professionals in the field of addiction. Various populations-at-risk are studied, and specific professional and ethical issues relating to these populations will be explored.
Components: Lecture

COUN 310 | Techniques of Counseling (3 credit hours)
This course will study the fundamental theories, principles, and techniques of counseling are presented as they apply to education, psychology, and social work practices. Practical experience in the use of numerous counseling techniques will also be provided and practiced in role play format.
Components: Lecture

COUN 320 | Assessment, Evaluation, and Casework Management (3 credit hours)
This course applies the theory and practice of current techniques utilized in alcohol and drug abuse casework. Special emphasis is placed on disorders relating to substance abuse/dependency diagnosis, treatment, and/or referral, including practice assessing and managing a sample case. Students will develop drug/alcohol assessment summaries, treatment plans, progress notes, and discharge plans. They will also write clinical case reviews of sample cases.
Components: Lecture

COUN 330 | Diversity Issues in Counseling (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on counseling issues that impact the socio-cultural, economic and educational factors in minority populations. Students learn traditional, as well as adapted, counseling techniques aimed specifically towards helping Native American, African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and other identified populations. Students practice intervention strategies in class sessions using identified issues.
Components: Lecture

COUN 390 | Group Work (3 credit hours)
Group Work focuses on the theories and dynamics of group counseling. A primary goal of the course is the development of specific skills that can enhance group leadership. Understanding the group process and group development, how to set up groups and choosing group members, and the different types of groups are covered. Students facilitate an experiential group process to practice the techniques presented.
Components: Lecture

COUN 410 | Addictions (3 credit hours)
This course surveys the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of a variety of populations that are at-risk for addictions, compulsions, and dependence, particularly focusing on alcohol and drugs. The etiological, behavioral, cultural, and demographic conditions and belief systems of various addictions are explored.
Components: Lecture

COUN 420 | Medical and Treatment Issues in Chemical Dependency (3 credit hours)
This course provides an overview of the medical and treatment trends and issues associated with alcohol/drug disorders, physical and mental disorders, generational use/abuse/dependence on alcohol and/or drugs, drug treatment theories, practices and programs, and unique or special populations.
Components: Lecture

EDUC 365 | Child Abuse and Neglect Detection (3 credit hours)
The content of this course will cover a broad range of topics dealing with child abuse and neglect issues as related to the public schools, the juvenile justice system, and the community at large. The course will emphasize the relationship between child abuse and juvenile delinquency. A further emphasis will be placed on equipping the student to obtain competent detection and reporting skills, skills dealing with the treatment of victims, and the prevention of abuse and neglect.
Components: Lecture

EDUC 570 | Attachment and the Defiant School Child (3 credit hours)

HP 301 | Analysis of Evil I (3 credit hours)
This course provides an overview and understanding of evil. This course includes an exploration of the definition and descriptions of evil as portrayed by religion, pop culture, selected American literature (short story and novel) and cultural anthropology. Additional focus will be given to the lives of serial murderers and law enforcement response to the acts of such people. Additional focus will be given to the topic of both victim and offender profiling.
Components: Lecture

HP 302 | Analysis of Evil II (3 credit hours)
This course provides an overview and understanding of ritualistic crime and deviant cult activities, particularly as it applies to small folk groups, isolated societies, small towns and rural environments. The course includes an exploration of the definition of evil as portrayed by religion, an understanding of various psychological, philosophical, sociological, and behavioral theories of evil, insights into the dynamics of groups that exhibit extreme violence or self-destructive behaviors and the people that lead them. Particular focus will be given to individual and group deviance, psychological dynamics of charismatic cult leaders and their followers, and church, community, civic agency/law enforcement responses to the acts of such people.
Components: Lecture

PSYC 250 | Human Growth and Development (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of growth from birth through old age. In addition, factors thought to influence this growth are also examined.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science

PSYC 420 | Social Influence, Compliance and Obedience (3 credit hours)
This is an in-depth examination of selected topics in social influence, the processes, through which a person or group changes or attempts to change the opinions, attitudes, or behaviors of another person or group. Topics will include compliance, conformity, obedience, cultural and gender differences in influence, and motivations and mechanisms of resistances to influence. Students will be introduced to current and classic theory within the social influence domain; including persuasion, compliance gaining, interpersonal influence and social influence through mass mediated contexts. Over the semester students will be exposed to thirty classic works in the disciplines of psychology, communication, business management, sociology, and cultural anthropology relating to the course title.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: PSYC 121 and PSYC 305

PSYC 450 | Abnormal Psychology (3 credit hours)
Focusing on personality disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, this course deals extensively with DSM-IV categories of abnormal psychology.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisite: PSYC 121, 250 and Junior Standing

SOC 255 | Diversity Issues in the United States (3 credit hours)
This course provides a comprehensive review of majority-minority relations in the United States and begins with an introduction of the sociological framework of the study of minorities, culture, prejudice, discrimination and intergroup relations. Subsequent weeks will be spent learning specifically about the experiences of a wide variety of minority groups, each starting with a socio-historical perspective and ending with a sociological analysis of their contemporary situation.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science

SOC 300 | Contemporary Social Problems (3 credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the causes, treatment, and prevention of selected social problems with particular emphasis on the problems of conflict and inequality. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science
Community, Regional & Global Studies

SOC 340 | The Family (3 credit hours)
This course provides an examination of the role of the family in contemporary society with an emphasis on the factors influencing the family structure, functions, and roles, and their implications for both the community and individuals at varying stages of the family life cycle.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Social Science

SPED 500 | Inclusionary Practices for Special Education (3 credit hours)
This course will provide an overview of the handicapping conditions served under the legislation of IDEA. A review of the law and the eligibility requirements for each identified handicapping condition will be examined. The purpose of the course will be to train general and special educators in practices conducive to creating inclusionary environments in which to teach both regular education and special education students. Best practices regarding the development of an inclusionary program will be presented. Methods of alternative instruction designed to meet individual needs within large group settings at the K-12 level will be discussed. Practice in collaborative techniques will be provided.
Prerequisites required: Graduate Status

SPED 540 | Behavior Management (3 credit hours)
This course will focus on basic principles of behavior modification as well as survey practical applications of this approach. Course content will include theoretical implications, behavioral and functional analysis, targeting behaviors, collecting information, interventions, positive behavioral support, and monitoring for change.
Prerequisites required: Graduate Status