Course Descriptions:

COLLEGIATE SKILLS (15 course credits)
Effective Communication Objectives

ENG 101 | English Composition (3 credit hours)
This course is a study of the principles of clear and effective expression as applied to the sentence, paragraph, and the whole composition. It includes a review of grammar, mechanics, and correct usages, as well as training in organization and the writing of short and long papers. This course, except for some exceptions is required for all freshmen. Each semester the department will offer at least one (1) special focus course but no more than two (2) (Note: Students who rank at the 85th percentile or higher on the English portion of the ACT may be excused from English 101. )
Component:
Lecture

ENG 201 | Advanced English Composition (3 credit hours)
This course provides advanced training in writing a variety of types of papers with emphasis placed on writing that requires the student to think critically, support generalizations, and appropriately acknowledge sources of information.
Component:
Lecture
Prerequisite required: ENG 101 or ACT/SAT

Choose one (1) of the following two (2) course options

SPCH 152 | Fundamentals of Speech (3 credit hours)
This course is a study of the principles of speech with an emphasis on the development of oral skills. Class emphasizes methods of organization and delivery for addressing various audiences.
Component: Lecture

OR

BUS 201 | Organizational Communications (3 credit hours)
Students study communication foundations, the writing process, and communicating through letters, memoranda, and e-mail messages. The culminating activity permits students to understand the report process and research methods, manage data and use graphics, and organize and prepare reports and proposals for the design and delivery of business presentations.
Component: Lecture

Quantitative Reasoning Objectives
(Choose one (1) of the following three (3) course options)

MATH 110 | Elements of Mathematics (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to give the non-mathematical student the opportunity to use basic operations, succeed in mathematical modeling and understand deductive and inductive reasoning. The general concepts covered will include sets, logic, the number system (natural numbers through the reals), equations, inequalities, problem solving, graphs, functions and geometry.
Component: Lecture

OR

MATH 112 | College Algebra (3 credit hours)
This course is for students who specifically need algebra in certain pre- professional programs. It covers algebraic principles and processes and is not to be taken for credit by students who have completed Math 113 or Math 120.
Component: Lecture

OR

Higher Level Math Course

STAT 210 | Statistics (3 credit hours)
A study of the methods of summarizing and interpreting data, elementary probability, and its relation to distributions. The meanings, importance, and application of the normal and binomial distributions and the methods of random sampling, testing of hypotheses, analysis of paired data, and interpretation of standardized test scores are covered. Students work on independent research projects to gain first- hand experience with the issues of the course.
Component: Lecture

TECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION (3 course credits)
Complete one (1) of the following course options

ART 112 | Introduction to Graphic Design (3 credit hours)
This course provides exposure to graphic design history, concepts, and processes.
Component: Lecture

ART 203 | 2-D Design Foundation (3 credit hours)
This computer-based course is a study of two-dimensional design and color theory.
Component: Lecture/Lab Combined

ART 215 | Typography (3 credit hours)
This course explores the dynamic between verbal and visual communication through typographic form. The history of letterform, text formatting and organization, and the balance between readability and style in type are addressed through page design structured by proportional systems and modules.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: ART 112

ART 313 | Illustration (3 credit hours)
This course guides students in understanding how illustration functions as an image that enhances or complements a specific text. An overall view of the field is covered through studio assignments that explore the creative possibilities of digital and traditional techniques combined with an emphasis on drawing. Students are limited to three (3) hours credit per semester. This course may be repeated for a total of nine (9) hours.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: ART 101

ART 314 | Digital Photography (3 credit hours)
This course emphasized the aesthetic aspects of photography including lighting, color, and composition. Students will explore camera and digital techniques such as exposure, color corrections, retouching, and creative image manipulation. Students are limited to three (3) hours credit per semester. This course may be repeated for a total of nine (9) hours.
Component: Lecture

ART 320 | Web Design (3 credit hours)
This course explores web site development with an emphasis on aesthetics and understanding audience. Students build structure, interactivity, and styling through code. Students are limited to three (3) hours credit per semester. This course may be repeated for a total of nine (9) hours.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: ART 112

ART 321 | Motion Graphics (3 credit hours)
This course emphasizes developing motion graphics for type and images that integrate spatial transformations, temporal and typographic considerations, frame mobility, and the principles of animation. Students are limited to three (3) hours credit per semester. This course may be repeated for a total of nine (9) hours.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: ART 112

CMIS 101 | Information Systems Concepts and Applications (3 credit hours)
This course is an introduction to basic computer concepts and Windows-based spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software currently used in industry. Development of problem-solving and proficiency using selected commercial software packages is stressed.
Component: Lecture

CMIS 210 | Essentials of Computer Programming (3 credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to programming and algorithm development using contemporary programming language with elements of program structure and subprogram usage. Problem-solving techniques, including stepwise refinement, are applied to problems in mathematics and business with algorithms for searching, merging, and sorting introduced. Contemporary issues associated with programming are also presented to students.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: CMIS 101

CMIS 300 | Information Systems Management (3 credit hours)
This course introduces concepts of systems management from a business viewpoint and an information systems viewpoint. Students utilize graphical tools including flowcharts to examine business and information systems processes. Fundamental programming concepts are introduced including algorithms, data types, control structures and Boolean logic. An overview of project management including critical path and dependencies is introduced.
Component: Lecture

CMIS 310 | Network Administration and Implementation (3 credit hours)
This course covers the fundamental principles of data communication and connectivity. Topics include network and protocol architectures, communications media and hardware, networking analysis, and management of network systems. Other areas of study include wireless and mobile networks. Network security is addressed.
Component: Lecture

CMIS 360 | Cyber Security (3 credit hours)
Fundamentals of information security are addressed. Current issues as well as historical incidents will be examined to assess vulnerabilities and provide solutions and countermeasures. Topics include identification and authentication, access control, security models, and operating system integrity. Security is considered from macro and micro scales and from virtual to physical intrusions. Costs, potential liabilities, and other issues with data leakage are explored. This course is designed so students of any major with an interest in Cyber Security may take the course.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: CMIS 101

CMIS 410 |Web Page Development and Programming (3 credit hours)
This course facilitates the development of skills in designing complex web sites. Current issues and design trends are considered as well as the fundamentals of web servers and browsers, and HTML and XHTML. Client side and server side programming and database connectivity over a web-based connection are explored. Web security and evaluation procedures for websites are covered.
Component: Lecture

CMIS 420 | Database Development and Programming (3 credit hours)
This course is a study of the methods used to store and access data. Database models are developed using various software platforms including the usage of Microsoft Access as a RAD (Rapid Application Development) tool. Other topics include a data security, normalization, and database design for Internet interaction.
Component: Lecture

EDUC 315 | Educational Technology (3 credit hours)
This course will focus on understanding and harnessing the power of digital media for teaching and learning. Students will learn to use that power to transform traditional teacher-centered classrooms into student-focused learning environments where P-12 students use digital media tools for the acquisition, analysis, construction, and presentation of knowledge. Hands-on experience will help pre-service teachers broaden their use of digital media tools and techniques, and they will learn rationales and strategies for developing 21st century literacies.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: Admission to Teacher Education

ENG 310 | Technical Communication (3 credit hours)
This course is designed for those students who someday wish to publish works of non-fiction, or who will be required to write technical manuals at work. It also focuses on communication within the job force. Making use of a variety of technologies, from Wikis to Google Documents, from Twitter to a variety of tools Microsoft Word provides, students will learn how to write effective e-mails, and project proposals that are often required in many different professions. Students will also learn how to tackle a large project.
Component: Lecture

PERSPECTIVES ON VALUES, THOUGHT AND AESTHETICS (6 course credits)
Choose two (2) courses in art, literature, modern languages, music, philosophy and/or theatre. The courses must be in different areas.

ART

ENGLISH

MUSIC

PHILOSOPHY

SPEECH

METHODS OF INQUIRY AND EXPLANATORY SCHEMA (13 course credits)
Natural Science
Choose one (1) physical science course and one (1) biological science course, at least one (1) of which must include a lab.

Biological Course Option: Biology

Physical Science Course Options: Earth Science, Chemistry or Physics

Social Science
Choose two (2) courses in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology;
one (1) must involve the study of formal social systems (ECON, HIST, PSCI)

COMMUNITY, REGIONAL AND GLOBAL STUDIES (3 course credits)
Choose one (1) interdisciplinary upper division course covering: a community’s culture, issues and development OR global issues and development or comparative culture studies.

ANTH 380 | World Mythology (3 credit hours)
This course examines myths and fables from ancient societies, their context, their cultural values and their survival. The course applies the perspective of myth and myth-making to modern politics. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

BUS 480 | International Business (3 credit hours)
Students learn contemporary business and management practices in multi-national market environments with emphasis on cultural, financial, and marketing differences. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

BUS 481 | International Field Experience: Business Principles and Practices (3 credit hours)
This is a specialized international field experience focused on understanding markets and business principles and practices in a specific country or countries. The impact of culture, political and economic systems, and historical context will be considered. Students will participate in a variety of daily activities, including tours, lectures, and guided discussion sessions designed to promote understanding of the topics. Included is the presentation of strategies to develop the appropriate level of preparation to meet challenges of working and traveling in an international/intercultural setting. This course satisfies the Methods of Inquiry and Explanatory Schema (Social Science), or the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: Sophomore Standing

CJUS 490 | Comparative Justice and Human Services Systems (3 credit hours)
This course allows students the opportunity to examine and compare the United States criminal justice system with those existing in foreign countries. Exploration and problem identification of key contemporary issues affecting these systems is an integral course element. The criminal justice system(s) under study are contrasted with the courts, policing, corrections and juvenile justice systems within the American system. In addition, innovative human service delivery systems are studied from a critical policy response perspective. Cultural and social factors that have influenced the development and ongoing operation of each system under study receive in depth examination. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisites required: Sophomore Standing

ENG 335 | Non-Western Literature (3 credit hours)
This course fulfills General Studies requirements for Community, Regional and Global Studies Objectives; to that end, the course requires that students analyze, from a socio-cultural perspective, issues of global significance on which the literature concentrates. The examinations, class discussion, and essays likewise invite students to evaluate and synthesize relevant interdiscplinary research to develop supported conclusions and describe their implications with respect to the issues raised in the readings from Libya to New Zealand, from the conflict between tradition and modernity as it relates to cultural values, to the political turmoil of post-colonial society.
Component: Lecture

HIST 351 | Modern Africa (3 credit hours)
Modern Africa presents the history of sub-Saharan Africa, concentrating on the events of the last three centuries and providing comparisons with European and American history. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

HIST 371 | Modern Middle East (3 credit hours)
This course examines the recent history of the Middle East region, focusing on the Arab-Israeli conflict, the growth of fundamentalism and terrorism, and the international conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

HP 315 | Global Studies and Development (3 credit hours)
The goal of this course is to explore complex global issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course examines how change and innovation are continuously transforming human endeavors such as technology, business, politics, laws, culture and arts. We will investigate how innovation and change can provide new solutions to the many challenges humanity faces, yet create novel problems and unintended consequences. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: HP 101

HP 330 | Public Education: Universal Right or Wrong? (3 credit hours)
On any given school day, approximately one out of six citizens is engaged in American public education as students, educators or support staff members. Universal public education is a uniquely American enterprise with a rich history and, given its status as a perennial lightning rod, a very uncertain future. Questions such as 1) What should the schooling process include or not include?, 2) How can the schooling process be improved?, and 3) What is the cost-benefit to society of the schooling process? – are questions that will be the focus of readings, discussion and debate in this course. This course will challenge students to think critically and broadly about the process of public education in the United States from past, present and future perspectives. In addition, students will learn about sixteen future trends and the five levers of the schooling process – structure, sample, standards, strategy and self – so as to form and articulate a framework of perception and facts that will enable students to be active participants in public education in the future as educators, parents and/or community members. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: HP 101

HPER 383 | Principles of Community Engagement in Public Health (3 credit hours)
The objective of this course is to utilize Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), Civic Engagement (CE), and Service Learning (SL) in order to increase community capacity as well as the confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities in public health. The format will include online lectures, case studies, interaction discussion boards, and face/time. In addition, select students will have the opportunity to engage in community-based SL and CBPR addressing a community public health priority. The course also seeks to facilitate learning in order that students may learn how to become effective leaders, advocates, and change agents for their rural communities to achieve paths to their desired futures.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: For Juniors and Seniors Only

MUSC 310 | World Musics (3 credit hours)
World Musics is an introduction to ethnomusicology, integrating the disciplines of anthropology and musicology. Students will learn to experience and understand music in the context of cultural beliefs and societal institutions. Students will gain exposure to, and analyze the musics of Africa, Native America, Asia, the Near East, the Pacific, and Eastern Europe. This course will also provide the student the tools with which to discover the meanings of music in the life of any society. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

PSCI 312 | Engagement in the Legislative Process (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to give students the tools they need for engagement in the legislative process at all levels of American government; local, state and national. Students will work in small collaborative groups to identify a contemporary political issue and analyze it from a socio-cultural perspective. The culminating activity will be to develop innovative strategies to positively impact the proposed legislative policies that address the issue.
Component: Lecture

PSCI 316 | Engagement in the Election Process (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to educate students about and provide opportunities for engagement in the election process at all levels of American government; local, state, and national. Student will individually volunteer in a political candidate’s campaign, collectively organize and conduct a candidate forum at Peru State College, and collectively organize and conduct an election night event (non-partisan) at PSC.
Component: Lecture

PSCI 351 | Modern Africa (3 credit hours)
Modern Africa presents the history of sub-Saharan Africa, concentrating on the events of the last three centuries and providing comparisons with European and American history. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program. Dual listed as HIST 351.
Component: Lecture

PSCI 371 | Modern Middle East (3 credit hours)
This course examines the recent history of the Middle East region, focusing on the Arab-Israeli conflict, the growth of fundamentalism and terrorism, and the international conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Dual listed as HIST 371.
Component: Lecture

SOC 300 | Contemporary Social Problems (3 credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the causes, treatment, and prevention of selected social problems with particular emphasis on the problems of conflict and inequality. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

SOC 395 | Community Development (3 credit hours)
This course explores common issues and opportunities at the community level and a variety of techniques available to promote community development.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: For Juniors and Seniors Only

SOC 396 | International Field Experience: Community Development (3 credit hours)
This is a specialized international field experience focused on understanding community development principles and practices in a specific country or countries. The impact of culture; political, economic, and education systems; and historical context will be considered. Students will participate in a variety of daily activities, including community service projects, tours, lectures, and guided discussion sessions designed to promote understanding of the topics. Included is the presentation of strategies to develop the appropriate level of preparation to meet challenges of working and traveling in an international/intercultural setting. This course satisfies the Methods of Inquiry and Explanatory Schema (Social Science) or the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement of the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: Sophomore Standing