Course Descriptions:

NATURAL SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS
Organismal Biology

BIOL 101 | Introductory Botany (4 credit hours)
This course examines the foundation principles of biology with special emphasis on anatomy, morphology, life cycles, reproduction, evolution and diversity of plants and related organisms. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components: Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science

BIOL 102 | Introductory Zoology (4 credit hours)
This course examines the foundation principles of biology with special emphasis on anatomy, morphology, life cycles, reproduction, evolution and diversity of animals and related organisms. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components: Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science

BIOL 301 |Microbiology (4 credit hours)
An introduction to the biology of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viral microbes; the diseases associated with microbes; and basic microbiology lab techniques. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components:
Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 101 and BIOL 102, or BIOL 210

BIOL 311 | Evolution and Systematic Biology (3 credit hours)
Evolution is the core theory of modern biology and all biology depends upon a robust systematic hypothesis of evolutionary relationship among organisms. This course presents the fundamental concepts of the modern Evolutionary Synthesis: adaptation, niche and population variation; microevolution; speciation and species isolation; systematic theory; phenetic and phylogenetic classification; and zoological nomenclature.
Components:
Lecture
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 101, BIOL 102

BIOL 317 | Ecology (4 credit hours)
The interactions among organisms and environment are studied in this course including major foci on ecology of the individual, population ecology, and community ecology. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components:
Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 101, BIOL 102

BIOL 404 | Genetics (3 credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to molecular, cellular, organismal, developmental and population genetics.
Components:
Lecture
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 101, BIOL 102

Biological Chemistry

BIOL 330 | Cellular Biology (3 credit hours)
Cellular Biology is an interdisciplinary class administered jointly by the Chemistry and Biology departments. The class is intended to provide the students with a detailed look at the organization and the chemistry of living cells. The course will teach students to understand and appreciate cellular structure and function through the understanding of structure in molecular terms and function in terms of chemical reactions and events.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisites required: CHEM 102 and BIOL 102

CHEM 101 | General Chemistry I (4 credit hours)
An introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry. Such topics as atomic theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, and pH are covered. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components: Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science

CHEM 102 | General Chemistry II (4 credit hours)
This course is an application of the fundamentals of chemistry, including states of matter, oxidation-reduction, thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components: Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisite required: CHEM 101

Final Defense

BIOL 495 | Senior Competency Exam (0 credit hours)
Components: Exhibition/Recitals
Requirement Group: For Seniors Only

DISEASE AND HUMAN HEALTH OPTION
Human Systems Biology

BIOL 210 | Human Anatomy (4 credit hours)
A comprehensive examination of the cell biology, histology, and organ systems of humans. The course is designed for students in allied health and pre-nursing. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Component:
Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisite required: BIOL 102

BIOL 312 | Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
An examination of the functions and interactions of the organ systems of the human body with an emphasis on the body’s homeostatic control mechanisms. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Components:
Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 102, BIOL 210

BIOL 315 | Introductory Immunology (3 credit hours)
This class is intended to provide students with basic concepts on the subject of immunology. The course will introduce students to defense mechanism of the body and nomenclature of immunology as well as the components of innate and adaptive immune responses. Students learn and appreciate the broad area of immunology and its importance as a frontier discipline of biomedical sciences. Students will understand types of immune responses and their general properties.
Components:
Lecture
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: CHEM 102 and BIOL 102

Biology of Disease

Choose three (3) of the following four (4) course options

BIOL 340 | Virology (3 credit hours)
This course will provide students with a basic conceptual understanding of virology and the effects of viruses on human health. Students will learn and understand the structure, function, and nomenclature of viruses as well as role of viruses as disease agents for humans and other living organisms. Students will understand and appreciate the broad scope of virology and its importance as a biomedical science including the role of viruses in emerging infectious disease.
Components:
Lecture
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 301 and 330

BIOL 385 | Disease and Epidemiology (3 credit hours)
This course examines historical and contemporary topics relevant to understanding how disease is manifested at multiple levels of organization (organismal, population, and ecosystem). Case studies from the primary and secondary literature will elucidate topics including (but not limited to): intra-host effects (pathogenesis, resistance, immunity); animal-human interactions (zoonoses; emerging diseases); disease spread and control (epidemiological models, treatment regimens, control measures); environmental science and disease (disease and biodiversity, ecosystem degradation, and in wildlife and agricultural systems); and evolution of host-pathogen relationships. Examples will be drawn from viral, bacterial, protozoological, helminthological, and non-transmissible diseases.
Components:
Lecture
Attributes:
Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group:
Prerequisites required: BIOL 101, BIOL 102

BIOL 398 | Human Parasitology (4 credit hours)
The morphology, ecology, epidemiology, and evolution of parasites are studied in this laboratory course. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis, course of infection, and clinical pathology of important human internal parasites. Both lecture and laboratory are required for this course.
Component: Lecture/Lab Combined
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisites required: BIOL 101, BIOL 102

HP 305 | Microscopic Monarchs: Disease in History (3 credit hours)
This course examines the influence of epidemic diseases on the course of human history and explores the importance of disease to medical, scientific, sociological, religious, economic, environmental, political, agricultural, and jurisprudential aspects of societies. Students in the course will therefore develop an interdisciplinary understanding of disease and learn to integrate and synthesize information from widely disparate fields of endeavor into a comprehensive understanding of the topic. The importance of diseases is examined historically and related directly to contemporaneous events in public health in all major regions of the world. Expertise in biology or health-related fields is not required; students from all fields of study are encouraged to enroll.
Components: Lecture

Capstone/Practicum

Choose one (1) of the following course options

BIOL 412 | Experimental Biology (3 credit hours)
Students will conceive, design and conduct a self-contained experimental research project in biology. The resulting data and conclusions will be reported in the form of a platform presentation and a technical manuscript. This is a capstone course for the Biological Science option and includes a student senior competency defense.
Components: Lecture
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science
Requirement Group: Prerequisites required: For Juniors & Seniors Only, BIOL 101, and BIOL 102

OR

BIOL 490 | Undergraduate Research Thesis (3 credit hours)
Type I and Type II thesis options are available and are completed in close cooperation with a faculty mentor. Type I Option: the student will conceive, design and conduct an independent experimental research project in natural science. The resulting data and conclusions will be reported in the form of a platform presentation to a professional society and/or a technical manuscript submitted for review/publication in a professional scientific journal. Type II Option: the student will conceive, design and conduct an independent review of the technical literature on a specific topic in natural science. The resulting literature review and synthesis will be reported in the form of a platform presentation to a professional society and/or a technical manuscript submitted for review/publication in a professional scientific journal. This is a capstone course for the Biological, Wildlife or Biochemical Science options and includes a student senior competency defense. Arranged.
Components: Research
Attributes: Methods of Inquiry & Explanatory Schema – Natural Science