Course Descriptions:

REQUIRED COURSES
BUS 353 | Organizational Ethics (3 credit hours)
This course applies ethical concepts and principles to moral issues in business: corporate responsibility, discrimination, advertising, competition, whistle-blowing, trade-secrets, multinationals, environment, workers’ rights, government regulation, investment, bribes, product liability, and consumerism.
Component: Lecture

BUS 373 | Organizational Behavior (3 credit hours)
This course presents the foundations of the history, theory, and applications of organizational behavior in the areas of personality, stress, motivation, job design, goal setting, learning theory, behavior modification, group behavior, power, leadership, organizational structure, decision-making, and control.
Component: Lecture

BUS 380 | Human Resources Management (3 credit hours)
Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts associated with human resource management and learn how to plan and implement strategies for efficient management of a firm’s most critical resources-employees. Recruiting, selecting, evaluating, developing, and compensating employees is emphasized, while legal issues, managing in a union environment and contemporary issues in human resources management will also be covered.
Component: Lecture

BUS 493 | Team Design and Performance (3 credit hours)
This course examines the design and performance of work and decisional teams including team composition, authority, communication, roles, support, and leadership. This course will prepare the student to be a successful team member and leader by exploring team evolution, self-management, and conflict resolution. This course is recommended for juniors and seniors in any degree program.
Component: Lecture

Select three (3) courses from the following options 

CJUS 490 | Comparative Justice and Human Services Systems (3 credit hours)
This course allows students the opportunity to examine and compare the United States criminal justice system with those existing in foreign countries. Exploration and problem identification of key contemporary issues affecting these systems is an integral course element. The criminal justice system(s) under study are contrasted with the courts, policing, corrections and juvenile justice systems within the American system. In addition, innovative human service delivery systems are studied from a critical policy response perspective. Cultural and social factors that have influenced the development and ongoing operation of each system under study receive in depth examination. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisites required: Sophomore Standing

HIST/PSCI 351 | Modern Africa (3 credit hours)
Modern Africa presents the history of sub-Saharan Africa, concentrating on the events of the last three centuries and providing comparisons with European and American history. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program. Dual listed as HIST 351.
Component: Lecture

HIST/PSCI 371 | Modern Middle East (3 credit hours)
This course examines the recent history of the Middle East region, focusing on the Arab-Israeli conflict, the growth of fundamentalism and terrorism, and the international conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Dual listed as HIST 371.
Component: Lecture

HP 315 | Global Studies and Development (3 credit hours)
The goal of this course is to explore complex global issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course examines how change and innovation are continuously transforming human endeavors such as technology, business, politics, laws, culture and arts. We will investigate how innovation and change can provide new solutions to the many challenges humanity faces, yet create novel problems and unintended consequences. This course meets the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: HP 101

PSCI 312 | Engagement in the Legislative Process (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to give students the tools they need for engagement in the legislative process at all levels of American government; local, state and national. Students will work in small collaborative groups to identify a contemporary political issue and analyze it from a socio-cultural perspective. The culminating activity will be to develop innovative strategies to positively impact the proposed legislative policies that address the issue.
Component: Lecture

PSCI 316 | Engagement in the Election Process (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to educate students about and provide opportunities for engagement in the election process at all levels of American government; local, state, and national. Student will individually volunteer in a political candidate’s campaign, collectively organize and conduct a candidate forum at Peru State College, and collectively organize and conduct an election night event (non-partisan) at PSC.
Component: Lecture

HPER 322 | Coordinated School & Community Health: Program Planning and Implementation (3 credit hours)
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills to develop a comprehensive coordinated school health program with emphasis on the health and physical activity components of the Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) model. In addition to implementing the plan in a school district, community outreach opportunities will be investigated.
Component: Lecture

HPER 383 | Principles of Community Engagement in Public Health (3 credit hours)
The objective of this course is to utilize Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), Civic Engagement (CE), and Service Learning (SL) in order to increase community capacity as well as the confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities in public health. The format will include online lectures, case studies, interaction discussion boards, and face/time. In addition, select students will have the opportunity to engage in community-based SL and CBPR addressing a community public health priority. The course also seeks to facilitate learning in order that students may learn how to become effective leaders, advocates, and change agents for their rural communities to achieve paths to their desired futures.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: For Juniors and Seniors Only

PSCI/HIST 305 | American Leadership (3 credit hours)
This course uses the works of historians and political scientists to examine leadership in its many facets – leading organizations, fostering change, winning elections, creating movements, and shaping public opinion. Dual listed as HIST 305.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: PSCI 201

PSCI/HIST 401 | International Conflict Resolution (3 credit hours)
This course describes the variety of means used since 1945 to resolve international conflicts, focusing on diplomacy, United Nations programs, humanitarian intervention, and non-violent social initiatives.
Component: Lecture

SOC 300 | Contemporary Social Problems (3 credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the causes, treatment, and prevention of selected social problems with particular emphasis on the problems of conflict and inequality. This course satisfies the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement in the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture

SOC 395 | Community Development (3 credit hours)
This course explores common issues and opportunities at the community level and a variety of techniques available to promote community development.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: For Juniors and Seniors Only

SOC 396 | International Field Experience: Community Development (3 credit hours)
This is a specialized international field experience focused on understanding community development principles and practices in a specific country or countries. The impact of culture; political, economic, and education systems; and historical context will be considered. Students will participate in a variety of daily activities, including community service projects, tours, lectures, and guided discussion sessions designed to promote understanding of the topics. Included is the presentation of strategies to develop the appropriate level of preparation to meet challenges of working and traveling in an international/intercultural setting. This course satisfies the Methods of Inquiry and Explanatory Schema (Social Science) or the Community, Regional and Global Studies requirement of the General Studies Program.
Component: Lecture
Prerequisite required: Sophomore Standing